With the release of Playstation 2 in New Zealand now not far away, (November 30) people have been asking what the key release titles are like to play. Although the PAL versions of these games have yet to be made available for review, we have obtained a Japanese copy of TTT on which this review is based.

The game itself now comes in a DVD movie-style case, thin, slim, and vertical. The case itself is slightly thinner than that of a standard PlayStation game case, but dropping a PS2 case will no longer cause the case to shatter -- a welcome feature to those with children (or butter-fingers). Within the case, besides the game CD and manual, there is also a thoughtful space designed to hold a memory card. The game CD itself shows off its newborn blue tinge, departing from the PlayStation’s ominous black. The manual is standard-fare, describing the available game modes and displaying basic fighting moves. Some have asked why all available moves are not included within the manual. The best answer would be because the manual would have to be so large, that it would be impractical to include it with the game. Sorry boys and girls. You’ll have to find another way of obtaining the moves...

Surrounded by large speakers, a high-resolution monitor and a brand spanking new Dual Shock 2 controller, I brace myself for the audio, and visual onslaught to come. Was I impressed? Well…

The introduction excels in graphical beauty, although it is not as emotive as Tekken 2 or Soul Blade. Nevertheless, it did not disappoint. Into the game menus, and all the old favourites have returned. Team Battle, Practice, Arcade, Survival - all familiar to the Tekken aware, and all welcome returns. Although not available initially, Theatre, Bowling and other modes can be unlocked with time, and completion of specific modes/tasks -- another Tekken tradition.

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